NPS Blog

Tag Archives: loyalty economics

Numbers count, but feelings come first

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  Long ago, one of my statistics professors in college cautioned me that statisticians tend to obsess about creating the highest R-squared. Inflating one’s R-squared might be just the ticket for getting your results published in … Continue reading

BlackBerry: NPS is “the real litmus test for us”

In a slick ad during Sunday’s Super Bowl, BlackBerry made it clear what its new Z10 smartphone can’t do: Set people on fire, turn human legs into an elephant’s and cause a careening tractor trailer to explode into a wave … Continue reading

Bruce Temkin: “Likelihood to recommend” tops customer experience measures

If you have even a passing interest in customer service analysis, you’ve probably heard of Bruce Temkin, co-founder of the Customer Experience Professional Association and managing partner of the Temkin Group, a customer experience research firm. Bruce’s company recently studied … Continue reading

A business where the ultimate goal is loyalty

Check out this item about a UK football (a.k.a. soccer) team—Birmingham City F.C. They are using Net Promoter to measure loyalty among first-time fans and attendees of corporate events. Loyalty is a pretty obvious element of any sports team’s business. … Continue reading

Achieving true sustainability in a throwaway society

Companies love to use buzzwords like “stewardship” and “sustainability” in their public relations campaigns. But inside their walls, many treat their most precious assets as disposable: people. Maybe it’s time to rethink corporate responsibility and return to the fundamental idea that companies … Continue reading

The root cause of your customer’s anger

This post originally appeared on Forbes.  Do you know the root cause of your customers’ delights and annoyances ? It’s a critical question. If you don’t, you can’t give them more of what they love. And you may be tempted to offer … Continue reading

Instilling holiday spirit in harried retail employees

Millions of shoppers are heading to their local malls these days, basking in holiday spirit as the late Andy Williams croons “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year” over the PA system. But some employees are probably ready to … Continue reading

“Wowing” customers every day, not just Black Friday

Many stores are adopting a hurry-up offense for Black Friday this year and opening the evening of Thanksgiving Day, hoping to attract the most eager shoppers. Is opening earlier (and cutting into employees’ time with their families) the way to delight … Continue reading

Calculating the economics of loyalty

This post originally appeared on Forbes.com. Imagine that you run a chain of hotels. You know that amid all the guests who stay with you there is a group of star customers. They visit often. They never stay anywhere else … Continue reading

Accounting for customers

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  Lucy Y., an accountant, responded to my recent post about “bad profits” with the comment that her profession is sometimes lured by the numbers into seeing “just a part of the story.” I think that’s true. … Continue reading

Shady sales tactics cast a long shadow

When salespeople use pressure and half-truths to close a sale, they create enemies for their company. These detractors will badmouth the company or its products to anyone who will listen. They will bring every single request and complaint, no matter … Continue reading

Is your company hooked on bad profits?

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  Too many companies these days are addicted to bad profits. Bad profits choke a company’s growth. They blacken its reputation and make it vulnerable to competitors. The pursuit of bad profits alienates customers and … Continue reading

Putting a value on customer loyalty

Very few companies have developed a rigorous gauge for assessing the worth of individual customers—one of the most important assets a company has. In the latest post on my LinkedIn blog, I react to the astute comment of an accountant … Continue reading