NPS Blog

Breaking down the “invisible fence”

Every company needs rules and traditions, but if left unchecked, restrictive policies can stymie creativity. They can give rise to what my next guest on the Net Promoter System podcast calls “invisible fence syndrome.”

Net Promoter System podcastLike a dog that’s been zapped too many times while trying to go beyond those invisible electrical fences so popular in suburban yards, employees with this affliction stop offering new ideas because they assume the response will be negative. Employees stuck in a culture of “no” start to feel that their contributions don’t matter. If employees don’t feel heard by their managers, it’s likely that customers also feel this way. It’s a dangerous situation for companies trying to build loyalty.

In the latest episode of the Net Promoter System podcast, we speak with Tony Ezell, who has worked to thwart invisible fence syndrome at Eli Lilly. During his more than two decades at the pharmaceutical giant, Tony has been responsible for adapting Net Promoter for the company’s scientists, sales teams and managers. He’s exceptionally candid about some of the challenges he encountered and how he would have tackled them differently now that he’s been through the experience.

Success in big pharma has always been associated with the discovery, development and marketing of new drugs. So why is a global powerhouse like Eli Lilly thinking about customer loyalty and the Net Promoter System? Find out in our latest podcast.

You can listen to our discussion on iTunes or through the player below. Click here to browse more Net Promoter System podcasts.

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