NPS Blog

Tag Archives: linkedin

Your customers aren’t yours

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  In certain businesses with limited competition or long-term contracts, executives can easily delude themselves into thinking they have captive customers. They might even be partly right: Many of their customers may use their services … Continue reading

What does an angry customer cost?

This article originally appeared on LinkedIn.  The byproducts of happy clientele are obvious. Sales rise. Stores fill. Facebook “likes” stream in. These promoters recommend the companies they like to their friends. The cost of detractors—a company’s “haters”—is less clear to … Continue reading

Creating questionnaires that deliver answers

When we developed the Net Promoter Score, we knew it would only work if we made the underlying questionnaire simple, easy and fast. If your survey response rates are less than 40% for a consumer-focused company or less than 60% for … Continue reading

The ultimate symbol of customer happiness: a smile

Customer service was simpler in the era before big box chains and online shopping, but many important truths remain the same: High-quality service doesn’t have to cost a lot, and it starts with knowing your customers. In my latest blog … Continue reading

One number, but many answers

When we developed the Net Promoter Score, the goal was to cut through the numbers noise and provide a truly useful metric for companies. Its power would lie in its ability to improve service quickly as part of a larger system … Continue reading

Never take your customers for granted

In certain businesses with limited competition or long-term contracts, executives can easily delude themselves into thinking they have captive customers. That is, until a major disruptive trend shatters this fantasy. And that always happens. In my latest post on LinkedIn, I discuss the … Continue reading

The danger of dismissing a dissatisfied customer

The byproducts of happy clientele are obvious, but the cost of detractors is less clear to many business leaders. By the time their irritation is evident in traditional metrics—declining sales, failed product upgrades, defections to rivals—the cause of their discontent … Continue reading

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The most toxic kind of corporate “waste”

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  In the suburb where I live, people regularly demolish 4,000-square-foot homes just because they’re a little outdated, clearing the way for new 8,000-square-foot estates. Everything goes into the dumpster— all the flooring, drywall, window, … Continue reading

Delighting bank customers one phone at a time

Almost one-third of the 74,700 US consumers that Bain & Company surveyed for its latest global Customer Loyalty in Retail Banking report used smartphones or tablets for banking during the three months prior to the survey. That’s up from one-fifth of respondents … Continue reading

How salespeople can destroy your business

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  Some executives don’t seem to care what their employees do to close a sale. Customers vote with their wallets, so buyers must have liked what they saw, right? Would those executives feel the same … Continue reading

Numbers count, but feelings come first

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  Long ago, one of my statistics professors in college cautioned me that statisticians tend to obsess about creating the highest R-squared. Inflating one’s R-squared might be just the ticket for getting your results published in … Continue reading

Don’t try to satisfy your employees!

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  Plenty of companies now understand that they need to turn more customers into promoters if they are to grow profitably. They also recognize that they can’t accomplish that goal unless front-line employees and supervisors are … Continue reading

Why the Golden Rule is good business

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  The Golden Rule—treat others as you would want to be treated—is a pillar of most of the world’s great religions. It lies at the heart of secular ethics. It is an expression of the basic … Continue reading

Let customers know you’re listening to them

Closing the loop is a central element of the Net Promoter system that Rob and I describe in our book. It signals to customers that their feedback actually produces results and brings that customer’s voice right inside the organization and allows … Continue reading

At stores, the most challenging time of the year

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.  The holidays are a prime time for stores to build loyal customers—or create detractors. Millions of shoppers are heading to their local malls these days, basking in holiday spirit as the late Andy Williams … Continue reading